Oracle Employs Blockchain to Solve A Billion-Dollar Food Industry Problem

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Time to Read: 2 minutes

Oracle will use its blockchain framework in combination with the Hive Network to develop a “BeeMark” label to show that honey is being produced sustainably.

With the aim of formulating innovative strategies to help farmers manage bee and pollinator habitats, Oracle partnered with the World Bee Project (WBP) to leverage cloud technologies to better understand the decline in global bee populations.

“Today’s bee population is declining at a very fast rate, which is being caused by human intervention and the use of fertilizers in crops. This is harmful for many reasons. For example, about 77% of all the food we eat depends on pollination. That equates to roughly $577 billion globally of food produced each year. Additionally, 1.4 billion farmers livelihoods rely on pollinators,” Jay Chugh, Oracle’s senior director of products, told me.

Further to this, Oracle announced that it is leveraging its blockchain platform to ensure that honey is being produced from sustainable sources. Oracle will use its blockchain framework in combination with the Hive Network to develop a “BeeMark” label to show that honey is being produced sustainably.

“The ‘BeeMark’ label is a monitor that we are using to capture sound, humidity, temperature, the weight of beehives and more. Once this data is captured it will be placed on the blockchain to show that honey hasn’t been changed or corrupted. Although still in its pilot phase, the idea is for consumers to go into a retailer and scan a QR code from the BeeMark label to validate that honey came from a particular source,” told John Abel, vice president of cloud and innovation at Oracle.

Related Article  Blockchain in Healthcare

Oracle’s blockchain platform is powered by Hyperledger Fabric and is currently only partnering with the World Bee Project, a non-profit organization.

Through the World Bee Project Hive Network, data is collected from the interconnected hives and is then captured, stored and shared across Oracle’s blockchain network. While Oracle doesn’t own the data, the blockchain network creates an open and transparent framework for all players to engage on.

“The World Bee Project posts the data that is collected and researchers from the University of Reading in London, another partner in this project, help inform and implement global actions that contribute to improving biodiversity,” said Abel.

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Oracle Employs Blockchain to Solve A Billion-Dollar Food Industry Problem

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